Admissions Interview: What To Wear

What to wear to a graduate admissions interview
Most applicants will experience this type of terror in one form or another: you get an email inviting you to an admissions interview and Open House– your heart fills with joy and your stomach does a flip. You spend the next 30 minutes unable to wipe the smile from your face. Then reality sets in: you have to meet with professors who hold your entire future in their hands.
Talk about stressful…
There is a lot out of information out there on what you should wear to interview for internships, jobs, and social events–but surprisingly little on how to handle a grad school admissions interview. This usually leaves students worrying about superficial things instead of what matters: the program.
Fear Not! We’ve compiled some tips, rules, and suggestions to alleviate your stress and ensure a great admissions interview. Once your bags packed, don’t forget to check out our Graduate Admissions Interview Questions list so you know what to ask.

Don’t Overdress

Indiana Jones SuitThis can’t be emphasized enough. A PhD is not an MBA: it is an academic degree. The people you’ll be meeting will be academics. How many professors did you have at your undergraduate university that actually showed up to class a la Indiana Jones? In fact, how many did you know that even wore clean clothes half the time? Professors are busy, intellectual people. You’ll get nowhere showing up in a full suit, and it will usually make you stick out in a not so great way. None of your fellow applicants, barring those at some financial management or economics departments, will be wearing suits. Even at an economics or finance department you’re likely to look overdressed in a suit.
The reality is you’re going to be around a lot of fairly nerdy people who spent the last half a decade working really hard to get to this interview, not modeling for GQ. You’re also going to be around a lot of current graduate students who will be wearing jeans, a worn in sweater, and comfortable tennis shoes in most cases. Now imagine yourself in a room full of those people, with you standing there in a charcoal suit. Feel a bit…awkward?
You’re of course welcome to wear a jacket if you want, but pair it with jeans or dress it down by rolling up the sleeves. You want to aim for dressing better than the haggard grad student showing you around (btw, they only volunteered to show you around to get a free lunch), while ensuring you don’t give off a used car salesman vibe.
Now don’t get us wrong, you should make an effort to be put together and look respectable, but forego business formal attire at all costs. At best it makes you look like you’re only going to graduate school to get a job at McKinsey, at worst it makes you look clueless and out of place.

Wear Loose Clothing

Never been to a graduate open house? You’re in for a real treat! A day packed with excitement and possibilities as you envision your future. They can also be tedious, exhausting, and long. Usually they manage to be a mix of both.  Most visit weekends go something like this:
You arrive on a Friday, best case scenario you were only traveling for ~5 hours total. Worst case you were traveling for 10 hours or more. Either way you’re going to arrive groggy yet nervous, at least until you’ve made it safely to your hotel. This is graduate world now, so you won’t have to worry about having an insane roommate in your hotel (most likely). It’ll probably be a quick chat about applications and then lights out early.
The next day will likely start with a breakfast orientation around 7:30-8:30am, so you’ll need to be up pretty early. From there each school is different for admissions interviews and open house events, but you’re looking at non-stop tours, interviews, luncheons, seminars, some more tours, coffee with current students, and then more interviews. At around 6 you’ll probably get 60-90 minutes to yourself before meeting up with professors or students for dinner. If you want a more detailed break down of what the day will be like, check out What To Expect At A Graduate Interview.
What does this have to do with clothing fit? Everything! You’re looking at a non-stop 12-15 hour day where you’ll want to look and feel your best. Young people have a tendency to shrug off small fashion discomforts, but this is not the place for insecure vanity. The smallest of irritations can compile to alter what you’re portraying and shift your state of mind: a belt that digs into your gut when you sit, a jacket that binds slightly across the shoulders, a shirt that you have to pull down every 5 minutes.
Wear clothes that are comfortable and loose enough that you can sit or stand in them without noticing a difference. If you’re a sucker for tighter fashion styles, opt for fabrics that stretch a bit so sitting and bending isn’t a problem.

Sweaters Are Your Friend

If you’re stressing out even a little about what to pack for your visit weekend or interview we’ve got one word, catch all, guaranteed appropriate: Sweaters. A properly fitting sweater, whether over a button down or just a t-shirt, is guaranteed to be appropriate, cost effective, and comfortable. It’s similar to what professors and other graduate students will be wearing, so you get the added benefit of looking like you fit in. There are a hundred different variations on a plain sweater and pretty much all of them will work just fine. The other thing we love about this option is that it’s weather appropriate pretty much anywhere. Go lightweight for California, heavy for the Northeast United States, and water resistant for the Pacific Northwest. graduate admissions interview

Admissions Interview Footwear

It happens to the best of us. Wearing the wrong kind of shoes is so common that few people will even bother to be judgmental about it at this point–but rest assured, admissions committees will notice bad footwear. It may not break your chances, but every minute of an admissions interview is a chance to show faculty how prepared you are for grad school. Giving them an excuse to make a snide comment or roll their eyes is the last thing you need. Conversely if you’ve already been accepted and are there to check out the campus, why on earth would you deter yourself from focusing entirely on the program and faculty?
What do we mean by proper footwear you ask?
Flats. Comfortable. Quiet. Closed toe.
Flats. Now we can already hear a few grumbles so we’re going to explain our reasoning. First, high heeled shoes are essentially NEVER appropriate for a graduate admissions interview. There is some wiggle room with this as with anything– some humanities programs where you’ll go nowhere near a lab or ever have to do any lifting of any kind for example, but these are few and far between. Even if that is the case, for the visit weekend you have no idea where you’ll be going on campus that day. You could have to walk through cobbled streets. The tour could take you across a grassy field. Maybe you’ll be climbing 10 flights of stairs for a view of the city. You just don’t know, and risking looking like an idiot wobbling around or yanking a heel out of the mud is the opposite of the kind of impression you want to leave. Beyond pragmatism there are other aspects that make high heels a bad call: even though faculty are supposed to be objective you could inadvertently send the wrong signal, to both female and male faculty.
Comfortable. This seems obvious but most people own at least one pair of shoes that hurt their feet–and they still wear them. The test these shoes need to pass is the ability to walk at 3.5 mph for at least 2 miles without any swelling, pain, rubbing, or blistering of any kind. If you start to feel discomfort, you’re in for a disastrous day. Keep in mind that a work day is only 8 hours, so you’ll be wearing these shoes longer than you would a work shoe. We can also guarantee you’ll walk at least 3-6 miles in them.
Quiet. This one will only seem important if you’ve ever owned a pair of noisy shoes. Most universities, particularly laboratory buildings, have a variety of hard flooring. This ranges from standard tile and concrete to more fancy polymer flooring. You don’t want to spend the entire day distracting everyone and feeling embarrassed because your shoes make an awful echoing sound in a cavernous basement laboratory. This is another area where heels can be a problem. Don’t force everyone to listen to you clop along like a clydesdale.
Closed toe. Unlike the previous tips, this one is entirely negotiable. If you’re visiting a school in California or really anywhere in the Southwest, everyone wears flip flops and sandals year round, and it’s fine if you do as well. This rule applies to those who will be entering any kind of lab. You can’t enter or work in those facilities with open toed shoes so it’s best to stay on the safe side. Even if you know you’re doing numerical analysis, you won’t know where they’ll want to take you for tours so always err on the side of caution.

shoescollage

Examples of appropriate shoes for this kind of event include:
Loafers. Excellent choice because they look fancy, are usually made of leather, and they feel like slippers. There are loads of options for men and women both, usually within a reasonable price range.
Oxfords. Another reasonably priced unisex option. These types of shoes can be slightly less comfortable than a loafer however, so make sure you can walk a good 2-3 miles nonstop without developing any blisters or tension in your feet before committing to a pair for the big day.
Your normal shoes. You know they’re comfortable, they’ve been properly worn in, and they’re what you’d wear everyday if you attended the program in question. The truth is that far too many graduate school applicants worry about dressing like they’re going to a traditional private industry interview–and graduate school couldn’t be further from that. Whether they be Converse, New Balance, or some well worn hiking boots, your normal shoes can always be paired with something appropriate for a graduate admissions interview or open house. Keep in mind you’ll still technically be a student so it’s ok to look like one. Throw a jacket or sweater over a button down, pack a pair of khaki colored jeans, and lace up your favorite Converse shoes. You’re good to go.

lowkey

 

Jacket and Jeans

If you’re not a sweater person, or you’re going to a department/university that is a bit more formal than STEM (e.g. economics or business PhD programs or a school in New York City, etc) this is a great unisex option. You can put a personal spin on it while still exuding an age appropriate maturity. Jackets can also give you a boosted sense of style and confidence while providing a good layering opportunity. Pro Tip: Rolling a jacket ensures it won’t wrinkle in transit, but if you’re planning on wearing a silk, satin, woven variety always carry it on a hanger.

jacket

Any Eventuality

Packing up and heading to an admissions interview in Boston? In February? And you’re not bringing a rain jacket?  We don’t expect you to pack a survival kit, but be aware of the weather. On the east coast and pacific northwest that means bringing a warm coat and rain jacket even if it calls for sunny 75 degree weather. Nobody is going to fault you if don’t have the latest Patagonia 4D stretch Gore-Tex jacket, but you’ll end up uncomfortable and potentially soggy if you don’t at least have an umbrella.

singingintherain

Don’t Get Controversial or Tacky

We put this on here only tentatively, because an education is foremost about discussion and debate, and your thesis work could very likely be something incredibly controversial. That may even be why your SoP caught someone’s eye. That said, you can never be sure whose toes you may step on, and while your potential advisor may love your theory that global warming is a century long government conspiracy to coverup the existence of aliens, always be mindful of the fact that they have tenure and you, most assuredly, do not. This goes for anything that could be deemed distasteful or disrespectful as well. Don’t wear that hawaiian shirt with half naked women on it. Don’t wear a t-shirt with obscenities. Don’t wear low cut blouses, see through tops, crop tops, off the shoulder sweaters, or short skirts of any kind. Do not wear shorts. This isn’t a debate on free speech– you’re allowed the legal freedom to wear whatever you like, but for this weekend keep it simple. You’re welcome to share your controversial viewpoints, just be sure and do it via a conversation instead of as a walking billboard.

 

Layer

As we’ve already mentioned, it’s a great idea to layer given that you won’t know what the weather is going to be like or whether the events room has a radiator that hasn’t been turned off since 1973. If you’re someone who has a tendency to sweat a lot, go with something linen that breathes and dries quickly. Make sure that whatever outfit you pick can fit under your winter coat, because you’ll almost surely be spending a decent amount of time outside walking between buildings. Even for an indoor event you’ll probably want to check out the town a little, so come prepared.

 

Look Your Age*

You’re young. Even if you think you’re old for the application process, you’re not. If you’re under 35 years old, you’re young. It is ok, even preferable, to look that way. You don’t have to dress like you’re a 60 year old Amish woman or borrow your grandfather’s elbow patched jacket from the 40’s. Dressing to look older or more mature than you are usually ends up doing the opposite. It’s all too easy to start reminding faculty of kids playing dress-up. Your goal is to convince them that you’re a future peer. This means being an energetic, sharp, mature, young adult. It’s ok to wear a new pair of trendy shoes if that is how you usually dress. *
Exceptions of course include anything that contradicts previous advice, such as wearing clothes that show a lot of skin, are overtly sexual, or vulgar.

 

Don’t Over Think Your Outfit

There are about a hundred things you’ll be worried about when you go to a graduate admissions interview: what if they ask me a question I don’t know, what if it’s super awkward, what should I ask about their research, where is my hotel again? You need to be able to focus on what matters this weekend: YOU. Not other peoples impressions of you and not whether the professors liked you. Focus on what you think of the campus, whether the faculty seem genuinely interested in sharing information, does the city seem like somewhere you’d want to live for 5 years, do you think you could be social in this cultural setting, what kind of facilities do they have on offer, etc. The only way you’re going to be able to stay focused on these things is if you don’t have a lot of superficial stuff flying through your brain. Pick a couple outfits that you feel physically comfortable in and that you’ve worn several times. Interview day is NOT the right day to try out a new look. Get your clothes picked out ahead of time and then don’t let yourself think about it again.

Pack Extra

Have two days of events going on? Bring three outfits. Planning on being there for one day? Bring two. It’s Murphy’s law. It’ll happen to someone, most likely at an 8am breakfast. A huge greasy sausage will fly off your fork and viciously attack your sparkling white button down. Always bring a backup. At the very least it’ll save you some worry.

 

If you follow these rules, we can guarantee you’ll be in the clear when it comes to your admissions interview suitcase. As long as you keep it classy, clean, and simple it’ll be a wardrobe malfunction free weekend. Now go enjoy your visit!
Still worried about how to handle an admissions interview? Check out What To Expect At A Graduate Admissions Interview for a complete discussion about what to expect and how to prepare and Graduate Admissions Interview Questions for a list of what to ask about when you’re there.

 

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Admissions Interview: What To Wear

What to wear to a graduate admissions interview March 31st, 2016
Most applicants will experience this type of terror in one form or another: you get an email inviting you to an admissions interview and Open House– your heart fills with joy and your stomach does a flip. You spend the next 30 minutes unable to wipe the smile from your face. Then reality sets in: you have to meet with professors who hold your entire future in their hands.
Talk about stressful…
There is a lot out of information out there on what you should wear to interview for internships, jobs, and social events–but surprisingly little on how to handle a grad school admissions interview. This usually leaves students worrying about superficial things instead of what matters: the program.
Fear Not! We’ve compiled some tips, rules, and suggestions to alleviate your stress and ensure a great admissions interview. Once your bags packed, don’t forget to check out our Graduate Admissions Interview Questions list so you know what to ask.

Don’t Overdress

Indiana Jones SuitThis can’t be emphasized enough. A PhD is not an MBA: it is an academic degree. The people you’ll be meeting will be academics. How many professors did you have at your undergraduate university that actually showed up to class a la Indiana Jones? In fact, how many did you know that even wore clean clothes half the time? Professors are busy, intellectual people. You’ll get nowhere showing up in a full suit, and it will usually make you stick out in a not so great way. None of your fellow applicants, barring those at some financial management or economics departments, will be wearing suits. Even at an economics or finance department you’re likely to look overdressed in a suit.
The reality is you’re going to be around a lot of fairly nerdy people who spent the last half a decade working really hard to get to this interview, not modeling for GQ. You’re also going to be around a lot of current graduate students who will be wearing jeans, a worn in sweater, and comfortable tennis shoes in most cases. Now imagine yourself in a room full of those people, with you standing there in a charcoal suit. Feel a bit…awkward?
You’re of course welcome to wear a jacket if you want, but pair it with jeans or dress it down by rolling up the sleeves. You want to aim for dressing better than the haggard grad student showing you around (btw, they only volunteered to show you around to get a free lunch), while ensuring you don’t give off a used car salesman vibe.
Now don’t get us wrong, you should make an effort to be put together and look respectable, but forego business formal attire at all costs. At best it makes you look like you’re only going to graduate school to get a job at McKinsey, at worst it makes you look clueless and out of place.

Wear Loose Clothing

Never been to a graduate open house? You’re in for a real treat! A day packed with excitement and possibilities as you envision your future. They can also be tedious, exhausting, and long. Usually they manage to be a mix of both.  Most visit weekends go something like this:
You arrive on a Friday, best case scenario you were only traveling for ~5 hours total. Worst case you were traveling for 10 hours or more. Either way you’re going to arrive groggy yet nervous, at least until you’ve made it safely to your hotel. This is graduate world now, so you won’t have to worry about having an insane roommate in your hotel (most likely). It’ll probably be a quick chat about applications and then lights out early.
The next day will likely start with a breakfast orientation around 7:30-8:30am, so you’ll need to be up pretty early. From there each school is different for admissions interviews and open house events, but you’re looking at non-stop tours, interviews, luncheons, seminars, some more tours, coffee with current students, and then more interviews. At around 6 you’ll probably get 60-90 minutes to yourself before meeting up with professors or students for dinner. If you want a more detailed break down of what the day will be like, check out What To Expect At A Graduate Interview.
What does this have to do with clothing fit? Everything! You’re looking at a non-stop 12-15 hour day where you’ll want to look and feel your best. Young people have a tendency to shrug off small fashion discomforts, but this is not the place for insecure vanity. The smallest of irritations can compile to alter what you’re portraying and shift your state of mind: a belt that digs into your gut when you sit, a jacket that binds slightly across the shoulders, a shirt that you have to pull down every 5 minutes.
Wear clothes that are comfortable and loose enough that you can sit or stand in them without noticing a difference. If you’re a sucker for tighter fashion styles, opt for fabrics that stretch a bit so sitting and bending isn’t a problem.

Sweaters Are Your Friend

If you’re stressing out even a little about what to pack for your visit weekend or interview we’ve got one word, catch all, guaranteed appropriate: Sweaters. A properly fitting sweater, whether over a button down or just a t-shirt, is guaranteed to be appropriate, cost effective, and comfortable. It’s similar to what professors and other graduate students will be wearing, so you get the added benefit of looking like you fit in. There are a hundred different variations on a plain sweater and pretty much all of them will work just fine. The other thing we love about this option is that it’s weather appropriate pretty much anywhere. Go lightweight for California, heavy for the Northeast United States, and water resistant for the Pacific Northwest. graduate admissions interview

Admissions Interview Footwear

It happens to the best of us. Wearing the wrong kind of shoes is so common that few people will even bother to be judgmental about it at this point–but rest assured, admissions committees will notice bad footwear. It may not break your chances, but every minute of an admissions interview is a chance to show faculty how prepared you are for grad school. Giving them an excuse to make a snide comment or roll their eyes is the last thing you need. Conversely if you’ve already been accepted and are there to check out the campus, why on earth would you deter yourself from focusing entirely on the program and faculty?
What do we mean by proper footwear you ask?
Flats. Comfortable. Quiet. Closed toe.
Flats. Now we can already hear a few grumbles so we’re going to explain our reasoning. First, high heeled shoes are essentially NEVER appropriate for a graduate admissions interview. There is some wiggle room with this as with anything– some humanities programs where you’ll go nowhere near a lab or ever have to do any lifting of any kind for example, but these are few and far between. Even if that is the case, for the visit weekend you have no idea where you’ll be going on campus that day. You could have to walk through cobbled streets. The tour could take you across a grassy field. Maybe you’ll be climbing 10 flights of stairs for a view of the city. You just don’t know, and risking looking like an idiot wobbling around or yanking a heel out of the mud is the opposite of the kind of impression you want to leave. Beyond pragmatism there are other aspects that make high heels a bad call: even though faculty are supposed to be objective you could inadvertently send the wrong signal, to both female and male faculty.
Comfortable. This seems obvious but most people own at least one pair of shoes that hurt their feet–and they still wear them. The test these shoes need to pass is the ability to walk at 3.5 mph for at least 2 miles without any swelling, pain, rubbing, or blistering of any kind. If you start to feel discomfort, you’re in for a disastrous day. Keep in mind that a work day is only 8 hours, so you’ll be wearing these shoes longer than you would a work shoe. We can also guarantee you’ll walk at least 3-6 miles in them.
Quiet. This one will only seem important if you’ve ever owned a pair of noisy shoes. Most universities, particularly laboratory buildings, have a variety of hard flooring. This ranges from standard tile and concrete to more fancy polymer flooring. You don’t want to spend the entire day distracting everyone and feeling embarrassed because your shoes make an awful echoing sound in a cavernous basement laboratory. This is another area where heels can be a problem. Don’t force everyone to listen to you clop along like a clydesdale.
Closed toe. Unlike the previous tips, this one is entirely negotiable. If you’re visiting a school in California or really anywhere in the Southwest, everyone wears flip flops and sandals year round, and it’s fine if you do as well. This rule applies to those who will be entering any kind of lab. You can’t enter or work in those facilities with open toed shoes so it’s best to stay on the safe side. Even if you know you’re doing numerical analysis, you won’t know where they’ll want to take you for tours so always err on the side of caution.

shoescollage

Examples of appropriate shoes for this kind of event include:
Loafers. Excellent choice because they look fancy, are usually made of leather, and they feel like slippers. There are loads of options for men and women both, usually within a reasonable price range.
Oxfords. Another reasonably priced unisex option. These types of shoes can be slightly less comfortable than a loafer however, so make sure you can walk a good 2-3 miles nonstop without developing any blisters or tension in your feet before committing to a pair for the big day.
Your normal shoes. You know they’re comfortable, they’ve been properly worn in, and they’re what you’d wear everyday if you attended the program in question. The truth is that far too many graduate school applicants worry about dressing like they’re going to a traditional private industry interview–and graduate school couldn’t be further from that. Whether they be Converse, New Balance, or some well worn hiking boots, your normal shoes can always be paired with something appropriate for a graduate admissions interview or open house. Keep in mind you’ll still technically be a student so it’s ok to look like one. Throw a jacket or sweater over a button down, pack a pair of khaki colored jeans, and lace up your favorite Converse shoes. You’re good to go.

lowkey

 

Jacket and Jeans

If you’re not a sweater person, or you’re going to a department/university that is a bit more formal than STEM (e.g. economics or business PhD programs or a school in New York City, etc) this is a great unisex option. You can put a personal spin on it while still exuding an age appropriate maturity. Jackets can also give you a boosted sense of style and confidence while providing a good layering opportunity. Pro Tip: Rolling a jacket ensures it won’t wrinkle in transit, but if you’re planning on wearing a silk, satin, woven variety always carry it on a hanger.

jacket

Any Eventuality

Packing up and heading to an admissions interview in Boston? In February? And you’re not bringing a rain jacket?  We don’t expect you to pack a survival kit, but be aware of the weather. On the east coast and pacific northwest that means bringing a warm coat and rain jacket even if it calls for sunny 75 degree weather. Nobody is going to fault you if don’t have the latest Patagonia 4D stretch Gore-Tex jacket, but you’ll end up uncomfortable and potentially soggy if you don’t at least have an umbrella.

singingintherain

Don’t Get Controversial or Tacky

We put this on here only tentatively, because an education is foremost about discussion and debate, and your thesis work could very likely be something incredibly controversial. That may even be why your SoP caught someone’s eye. That said, you can never be sure whose toes you may step on, and while your potential advisor may love your theory that global warming is a century long government conspiracy to coverup the existence of aliens, always be mindful of the fact that they have tenure and you, most assuredly, do not. This goes for anything that could be deemed distasteful or disrespectful as well. Don’t wear that hawaiian shirt with half naked women on it. Don’t wear a t-shirt with obscenities. Don’t wear low cut blouses, see through tops, crop tops, off the shoulder sweaters, or short skirts of any kind. Do not wear shorts. This isn’t a debate on free speech– you’re allowed the legal freedom to wear whatever you like, but for this weekend keep it simple. You’re welcome to share your controversial viewpoints, just be sure and do it via a conversation instead of as a walking billboard.

 

Layer

As we’ve already mentioned, it’s a great idea to layer given that you won’t know what the weather is going to be like or whether the events room has a radiator that hasn’t been turned off since 1973. If you’re someone who has a tendency to sweat a lot, go with something linen that breathes and dries quickly. Make sure that whatever outfit you pick can fit under your winter coat, because you’ll almost surely be spending a decent amount of time outside walking between buildings. Even for an indoor event you’ll probably want to check out the town a little, so come prepared.

 

Look Your Age*

You’re young. Even if you think you’re old for the application process, you’re not. If you’re under 35 years old, you’re young. It is ok, even preferable, to look that way. You don’t have to dress like you’re a 60 year old Amish woman or borrow your grandfather’s elbow patched jacket from the 40’s. Dressing to look older or more mature than you are usually ends up doing the opposite. It’s all too easy to start reminding faculty of kids playing dress-up. Your goal is to convince them that you’re a future peer. This means being an energetic, sharp, mature, young adult. It’s ok to wear a new pair of trendy shoes if that is how you usually dress. *
Exceptions of course include anything that contradicts previous advice, such as wearing clothes that show a lot of skin, are overtly sexual, or vulgar.

 

Don’t Over Think Your Outfit

There are about a hundred things you’ll be worried about when you go to a graduate admissions interview: what if they ask me a question I don’t know, what if it’s super awkward, what should I ask about their research, where is my hotel again? You need to be able to focus on what matters this weekend: YOU. Not other peoples impressions of you and not whether the professors liked you. Focus on what you think of the campus, whether the faculty seem genuinely interested in sharing information, does the city seem like somewhere you’d want to live for 5 years, do you think you could be social in this cultural setting, what kind of facilities do they have on offer, etc. The only way you’re going to be able to stay focused on these things is if you don’t have a lot of superficial stuff flying through your brain. Pick a couple outfits that you feel physically comfortable in and that you’ve worn several times. Interview day is NOT the right day to try out a new look. Get your clothes picked out ahead of time and then don’t let yourself think about it again.

Pack Extra

Have two days of events going on? Bring three outfits. Planning on being there for one day? Bring two. It’s Murphy’s law. It’ll happen to someone, most likely at an 8am breakfast. A huge greasy sausage will fly off your fork and viciously attack your sparkling white button down. Always bring a backup. At the very least it’ll save you some worry.

 

If you follow these rules, we can guarantee you’ll be in the clear when it comes to your admissions interview suitcase. As long as you keep it classy, clean, and simple it’ll be a wardrobe malfunction free weekend. Now go enjoy your visit!
Still worried about how to handle an admissions interview? Check out What To Expect At A Graduate Admissions Interview for a complete discussion about what to expect and how to prepare and Graduate Admissions Interview Questions for a list of what to ask about when you’re there.

 

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