What Is The Difference Between A CV And A Resume?

difference between a CV and a resume


What is the difference between a CV and a resume?

Almost all graduate school applications require a CV, and for those that don’t–it’s still a good idea to upload one if possible. Most students have a general idea of what a CV/resume is, but when pressed, few can outline the difference between a CV and a resume.
So in this post we’re going to clear this up once and for all: What is the difference between a CV and a resume?
Curriculum Vitae (CV) is Latin for “course of life” where resume is French for “summary.” Not coincidentally, these translations describe the main differences between a CV and a resume.

 

 

Resumes

Let’s start with a quick overview of resumes, which is most familiar. A typical resume is a general and concise introduction of your experience and skills related to a particular position. A resume will need to be altered for each position to emphasize the skills most relevant to that job. Resumes are usually no more than 1-2 pages in length maximum. They are accompanied by cover letters, which provide additional personal and motivational details in paragraph format. Resumes lead with work experience. 
A typical resume will include the following:
  • Name and Contact Information
  • Education
  • Work Experience
  • References
A resume is a simple and to the point document. It’s difficult to fluff without outrightly lying, and serves as an overview more than a comprehensive reference of a persons professional achievements.

 

Curriculum Vitae

In contrast, a CV is a detailed and comprehensive overview of your life’s accomplishments, particularly those most relevant to the realm of academia. Because academic researchers are often working on and completing many projects and teaching responsibilities simultaneously, you should think of a CV as a living document that will need to be updated frequently. A typical CV for someone beginning their graduate school career might only be two or four pages in length, while a seasoned researcher’s CV may be 20+ pages in length! Despite length, CVs always lead with education (not work experience).
Typical CVs include:
  • Contact Info
  • Education, including dissertation or thesis titles and summaries
  • Teaching Experience
  • Research Experience
  • Honors, Awards, Fellowships, Grants
  • Employment and Experience (volunteer work, leadership, other internships etc)
  • Publications
  • Conference Presentations
  • Professional Memberships
  • Service
  • References
CVs are used by individuals seeking fellowships, grants, postdoctoral positions, teaching, and research positions in postsecondary institutions or high-level research positions in industry.
Graduate school applications request a CV, and for younger applicants they will usually look more like a resume that includes publications, technical skills, and descriptions of research projects. That said, if you have experience in other areas, like teaching a recitation or attending conferences, you should be sure and include these in their own headings just as a seasoned professor would.  For an outline and examples of graduate school application CVs, read through our How To Make A CV Guide.

 

What do CVs and resumes have in common?

CVs and resumes are still both used to get a job of some kind, whether it’s in academia or private industry, so there is some general overlap.
  • Both are tailored for the specific appointment
  • They should represent you as the most qualified candidate
  • Both are used to get you to an interview
  • Neither include personal interests
  • In both CVs and resumes, information within sections is organized chronologically

 


So in short, the difference between a CV and a resume is pretty straightforward. A resume is a document that summarizes your education, experiences, and competencies, and is designed to introduce you to an employer and highlight your qualifications for a specific job or type of work. Whereas a curriculum vitae (CV) is a more comprehensive document that details ALL your past education, experiences, and competencies, including public presentations, academic writing and professional development. A CV is designed to introduce you to employers in academics, advanced research, post-secondary teaching and fine arts.
Note: In Europe, the term CV is often used to describe all job application documents, including a resume. In the United States and Canada, CV and resume are also sometimes used interchangeably.

 

 

Difference between a CV and a resume

 

For more general resume and CV guidance by country, check out The Global Resume and CV Guide
Author
By
@

Readers Comments

Trending Topics

grad school interview

Can I Turn Down An Interview?

December 25th, 2016

Yes. But you probably shouldn’t turn down a grad school interview. Next question…… Not a satisfying answer? Ok, we’ll elaborate. Note: If you want to attend, but have ...

Grad School Interview Conflicts

Grad School Interview Conflicts

December 13th, 2016

Grad school interview conflicts are a great problem to have, but a problem nonetheless. The first time you get an interview invitation, it’s incredibly exciting. Then ...

Trending

graduate admissions results

Waiting For Admissions Results: How To Stay Sane

December 24th, 2016

  All your applications are submitted. The holidays are over. All that’s left is waiting for graduate admissions results to roll in. Life is great, right? ...

If you haven't heard back from graduate school admissions yet, does it mean you're rejected?

I Haven’t Heard Back Yet, AM I REJECTED?

December 23rd, 2016

For most applicants, the blissful few weeks after applications are submitted is a gift. Finals are over and you have a week or two away from work and ...

Subscribe

Want to get graduate school application tips sent straight to your email? Sign up so you never miss a post. You'll get free advice throughout the application season and we'll never spam your inbox!
Email *

Trending

You CAN Get Into Grad School With Low GRE Scores

June 19th, 2016

  Grad School With Low GRE Scores? Yes! We’re going to try and convince you that you can get into graduate school with a mediocre GRE ...

GRE Words

How Many GRE Words Should I Learn?

May 10th, 2016

Learning GRE words can be a daunting aspect of your study program. It’s about practicing questions andlearning material, which is a process that can takes weeks, months, or even years. This ...

Trending Topics

grad school interview

Can I Turn Down An Interview?

December 25th, 2016

Yes. But you probably shouldn’t turn down a grad school interview. Next question…… Not a satisfying answer? Ok, we’ll elaborate. Note: If you want to attend, but have ...

Grad School Interview Conflicts

Grad School Interview Conflicts

December 13th, 2016

Grad school interview conflicts are a great problem to have, but a problem nonetheless. The first time you get an interview invitation, it’s incredibly exciting. Then ...

Trending

graduate admissions results

Waiting For Admissions Results: How To Stay Sane

December 24th, 2016

  All your applications are submitted. The holidays are over. All that’s left is waiting for graduate admissions results to roll in. Life is great, right? ...

If you haven't heard back from graduate school admissions yet, does it mean you're rejected?

I Haven’t Heard Back Yet, AM I REJECTED?

December 23rd, 2016

For most applicants, the blissful few weeks after applications are submitted is a gift. Finals are over and you have a week or two away from work and ...

Subscribe

Trending

You CAN Get Into Grad School With Low GRE Scores

June 19th, 2016

  Grad School With Low GRE Scores? Yes! We’re going to try and convince you that you can get into graduate school with a mediocre GRE ...

GRE Words

How Many GRE Words Should I Learn?

May 10th, 2016

Learning GRE words can be a daunting aspect of your study program. It’s about practicing questions andlearning material, which is a process that can takes weeks, months, or even years. This ...

What Is The Difference Between A CV And A Resume?

difference between a CV and a resume April 27th, 2016


What is the difference between a CV and a resume?

Almost all graduate school applications require a CV, and for those that don’t–it’s still a good idea to upload one if possible. Most students have a general idea of what a CV/resume is, but when pressed, few can outline the difference between a CV and a resume.
So in this post we’re going to clear this up once and for all: What is the difference between a CV and a resume?
Curriculum Vitae (CV) is Latin for “course of life” where resume is French for “summary.” Not coincidentally, these translations describe the main differences between a CV and a resume.

 

 

Resumes

Let’s start with a quick overview of resumes, which is most familiar. A typical resume is a general and concise introduction of your experience and skills related to a particular position. A resume will need to be altered for each position to emphasize the skills most relevant to that job. Resumes are usually no more than 1-2 pages in length maximum. They are accompanied by cover letters, which provide additional personal and motivational details in paragraph format. Resumes lead with work experience. 
A typical resume will include the following:
  • Name and Contact Information
  • Education
  • Work Experience
  • References
A resume is a simple and to the point document. It’s difficult to fluff without outrightly lying, and serves as an overview more than a comprehensive reference of a persons professional achievements.

 

Curriculum Vitae

In contrast, a CV is a detailed and comprehensive overview of your life’s accomplishments, particularly those most relevant to the realm of academia. Because academic researchers are often working on and completing many projects and teaching responsibilities simultaneously, you should think of a CV as a living document that will need to be updated frequently. A typical CV for someone beginning their graduate school career might only be two or four pages in length, while a seasoned researcher’s CV may be 20+ pages in length! Despite length, CVs always lead with education (not work experience).
Typical CVs include:
  • Contact Info
  • Education, including dissertation or thesis titles and summaries
  • Teaching Experience
  • Research Experience
  • Honors, Awards, Fellowships, Grants
  • Employment and Experience (volunteer work, leadership, other internships etc)
  • Publications
  • Conference Presentations
  • Professional Memberships
  • Service
  • References
CVs are used by individuals seeking fellowships, grants, postdoctoral positions, teaching, and research positions in postsecondary institutions or high-level research positions in industry.
Graduate school applications request a CV, and for younger applicants they will usually look more like a resume that includes publications, technical skills, and descriptions of research projects. That said, if you have experience in other areas, like teaching a recitation or attending conferences, you should be sure and include these in their own headings just as a seasoned professor would.  For an outline and examples of graduate school application CVs, read through our How To Make A CV Guide.

 

What do CVs and resumes have in common?

CVs and resumes are still both used to get a job of some kind, whether it’s in academia or private industry, so there is some general overlap.
  • Both are tailored for the specific appointment
  • They should represent you as the most qualified candidate
  • Both are used to get you to an interview
  • Neither include personal interests
  • In both CVs and resumes, information within sections is organized chronologically

 


So in short, the difference between a CV and a resume is pretty straightforward. A resume is a document that summarizes your education, experiences, and competencies, and is designed to introduce you to an employer and highlight your qualifications for a specific job or type of work. Whereas a curriculum vitae (CV) is a more comprehensive document that details ALL your past education, experiences, and competencies, including public presentations, academic writing and professional development. A CV is designed to introduce you to employers in academics, advanced research, post-secondary teaching and fine arts.
Note: In Europe, the term CV is often used to describe all job application documents, including a resume. In the United States and Canada, CV and resume are also sometimes used interchangeably.

 

 

Difference between a CV and a resume

 

For more general resume and CV guidance by country, check out The Global Resume and CV Guide
By
@
backtotop